Ruth's Genealogy

“And in the end, it's not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years.”

This Genealogy On A Budget series presents links to free online genealogy databases.

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If you have ancestors from the Republic of Texas, before it became the 28th state to join the Union in 1845, then you might want to check out the Texas General Land Office Land Grant Database:

The Land Office Archives contains documents issued by the new Republic of Texas after winning independence from Mexico in 1836. Some of the most popular documents in the Archive relate to the land grant certificates issued to Texians who rendered military service in battle during the Texas Revolution, including William B. Travis, David Crockett and Sam Houston.

After annexation by the United States in 1845, Texas retained control of its public domain, unlike other western states, and continued to distribute its land. Prior to 1900, Texas was a cash poor state, and used land to secure and pay off debt, reward veterans, encourage economic development, finance public education and even in building the State Capitol.

I have one such ancestor: my 4th great-grandfather, John Hamilton, Jr, born in Ohio about 1810 and “arrived in this Republic in April 1836 as a Vol and has served a tour of duty in The Army of Texas…”

This document, dated 2 Apr 1838, notes John Hamilton’s arrival in Texas, his service with the Army of Texas, his subsequent entitlement of land… even his marital status.

148390_01

Priceless!

This Genealogy On A Budget series presents links to free online genealogy databases.

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I have several physicians in my RootsMagic database: 4 from Alabama, 1 from South Carolina and 2 from Texas.

The Texas Medical Center in Houston, Texas maintains an institutional repository, the DigitalCommons @ TMC. Here can be found a massive database of Texas doctors, the Gazetteer of Deceased Texas Physicians (19th and 20th Century).

The Gazetteer lists physicians and information such as birth and death dates, date of graduation, specialty and primary location. Information is drawn from the Dallas Medical Journal (1920 – 1990), The Texas State Journal of Medicine (1905 – 1956), and the licensure records in the Texas State Board of Medical Examiners Collection. Obituaries from state, regional and local sources were used as sources from 1990- 2009. This list is as comprehensive as time and resources allowed and does not purport to be complete.

At this time, the database is not searchable online; it is presented as downloadable pdfs, divided alphabetically into sections by the first letter of the physician’s last name.

Below is the data for my second great-granduncle, Thomas Joshua Bennett:

TJBennett creds

As you can see, his date of birth & death, the medical school he attended and the date of graduation, profession membership and medical specialty, even his obituary, are given.

While technically an index, it is still a wonderful resource for Texas research.

 

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