Notes from the past…


Leave a comment

The McBurnetts and the Civil War

If I were to do a one-name study, the McBurnett surname would probably be my first choice to examine. Nicholas McBurnett lived and raised his family in Georgia during the most turbulent period in United States history, the Civil War Era. Of his 11 children, 3 sons and 2 sons-in-law fought in the conflict. Sons Thomas and Joshua died while in the service and son-in-law Shadrack Thompson was severely wounded in the leg and left a cripple for the rest of his life. A second son-in-law, James Seigler, developed chronic diarrhea while serving and suffered from it until his death in 1883. 2 of the men were captured at the Battle of Vicksburg and 1 at the Battle of Perryville and became Prisoners of War. The families of four of Nicholas’ sons received Confederate Pensions in later life. Son Daniel McBurnett, only 13 years old in 1860, may also have joined up. Footnote has documents for D McBurnett of Carroll County, enlisting in March 1862 into the same unit as older brother James and being mustered out in July 1862. As not many men were mustered out of the service of the Confederacy in 1862, unless due to injury or illness, perhaps this D McBurnett was young Daniel and he was discharged because of his age.

Thanks to Ancestry’s Georgia, Confederate Pension Applications, 1879-1960 and Civil War Prisoner of War Records, 1861-1865 and Footnote’s Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of Georgia, I have downloaded a wealth of documents pertaining to the McBurnetts’ Civil War experiences.

Some of the genealogical data to be found in these documents:

  • Name of the subject, including initials or little-used middle name
  • Names of spouse and children
  • Dates and locations of birth and death
  • Date and location of marriage
  • Military units served in and dates and locations of service
  • Financial data
  • Physical descriptions and wounds or illness from military service
  • Where the subject lived after Civil War service
  • Names of friends and fellow veterans

In conjunction with census documents, I have been able to trace Nicholas’ children and their families and have developed a good overall image of life in Civil War Georgia. Still needed is land, voter and tax documentation and also anything probate.

And where are all of these people buried at? Still working on that…